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ChancellorsvilleThe Battle and Its Aftermath$
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Gary W. Gallagher

Print publication date: 1996

Print ISBN-13: 9780807822753

Published to North Carolina Scholarship Online: July 2014

DOI: 10.5149/9780807835906_gallagher

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Stoneman's Raid

Stoneman's Raid

Chapter:
(p.65) Stoneman's Raid
Source:
Chancellorsville
Author(s):

A. Wilson Greene

Publisher:
University of North Carolina Press
DOI:10.5149/9780807835906_gallagher.6

George Stoneman's cavalry raid is often viewed as one of the more egregious Union failures during the Chancellorsville campaign. Poorly conceived by Hooker and indifferently executed by Stoneman, according to the common argument, it denied the Army of the Potomac vital cavalry screening while garnering no compensatory advantage. This chapter takes issue with much of the conventional interpretation, dismissing, for example, the notion that the presence of more Federal cavalry would have changed the tactical situation on Hooker's right flank on May 2. While making no extravagant claims about the positive impact of Stoneman's activities, the chapter points to a number of solid accomplishments. It argues that Stoneman's raid rather than Brandy Station marked the beginning of a transformation within the ranks of the Union cavalry.

Keywords:   Civil War, military campaigns, George Stoneman, cavalry, Union, Federals

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