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ChancellorsvilleThe Battle and Its Aftermath$
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Gary W. Gallagher

Print publication date: 1996

Print ISBN-13: 9780807822753

Published to North Carolina Scholarship Online: July 2014

DOI: 10.5149/9780807835906_gallagher

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Disgraced and Ruined by the Decision of the Court the Court-Martial of Emory F Best C.S.A.

Disgraced and Ruined by the Decision of the Court the Court-Martial of Emory F Best C.S.A.

Chapter:
(p.200) Disgraced and Ruined by the Decision of the Court the Court-Martial of Emory F Best C.S.A.
Source:
Chancellorsville
Author(s):

Keith S. Bohannon

Publisher:
University of North Carolina Press
DOI:10.5149/9780807835906_gallagher.10

On May 2, 1863, Col. Emory F. Best and his 23rd Georgia Infantry received orders to guard the rear of Jackson's flanking column. Well before the Confederate Second Corps mounted its assault late that afternoon, Best and his regiment experienced a humiliating debacle, in the course of which the colonel abandoned his men and approximately 250 Confederates surrendered. Drawing on testimony from Best's court-martial and other manuscript sources, this chapter assesses the ways in which political influence, widely divergent versions of what transpired, and notions about personal courage helped determine the fate of the accused. Denied the glory savored by most of Lee's soldiers after Chancellorsville, Best and other members of the 23rd who fled on May 2 also stood outside the circle of Lost Cause heroes after the war.

Keywords:   Civil War, military campaigns, 23rd Georgia Infantry, Confederates, political influence, Lost Cause heroes

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