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North Carolinians in the Era of the Civil War and Reconstruction$
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Paul D. Escott

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780807832226

Published to North Carolina Scholarship Online: July 2014

DOI: 10.5149/9780807837269_escott

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Different Colored Currents of the Sea: Reconstruction North Carolina, Mutuality, and the Political Roots of Jim Crow, 1872–1875

Different Colored Currents of the Sea: Reconstruction North Carolina, Mutuality, and the Political Roots of Jim Crow, 1872–1875

Chapter:
(p.221) Different Colored Currents of the Sea: Reconstruction North Carolina, Mutuality, and the Political Roots of Jim Crow, 1872–1875
Source:
North Carolinians in the Era of the Civil War and Reconstruction
Author(s):

Paul Yandle

Publisher:
University of North Carolina Press
DOI:10.5149/9780807837269_escott.11

This chapter focuses on Paul Gaston's The New South Creed, in which he notes the unanimity with which white southerners saw themselves as the protectors of African Americans in a segregated society after the postwar amendments to the Constitution provided the slaves with freedom and United States citizenship. Gaston's work is probably the most recognizable of those covering the development of a “New South” philosophy in newspaper and magazine articles and lectures written and given between the 1860s and 1890s. Gaston presents an array of newspaper editors and southern men of letters who provided the public with pictures of an industrialized, self-sufficient, segregated South that allowed politicians and jurists to undo the gains African Americans had made during Reconstruction and to move toward Jim Crow.

Keywords:   Paul Gaston, New South Creed, white southerners, African Americans, segregated society, postwar amendments

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