Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Radical MovesCaribbean Migrants and the Politics of Race in the Jazz Age$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Lara Putnam

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780807835821

Published to North Carolina Scholarship Online: July 2014

DOI: 10.5149/9780807838136_putnam

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA PRESS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.northcarolina.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of North Carolina Press, 2017. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CSO for personal use (for details see http://www.northcarolina.universitypressscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 11 December 2017

Three Alien Everywhere

Three Alien Everywhere

Immigrant Exclusion and Populist Bargains, 1920s–1930s

Chapter:
(p.82) Three Alien Everywhere
Source:
Radical Moves
Author(s):

Lara Putnam

Publisher:
University of North Carolina Press
DOI:10.5149/9780807838136_putnam.8

This chapter discusses the new laws that restricted the entry and employment of black “aliens” in the United States, Latin America, and British Caribbean. The U.S. Johnson–Reed Act of 1924, in particular, confronted British Caribbeans with an unprecedented and portentous break. This nominally race-neutral rule functioned as a nearly total ban on immigrant visas for British Caribbeans, causing a drop from over 12,000 arrivals in the first six months of 1924 to under 800 in 1925.

Keywords:   black aliens, United States, Johnson–Reed Act, British Caribbeans, immigrant visas

North Carolina Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .