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White Over BlackAmerican Attitudes toward the Negro, 1550-1812$
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Winthrop D. Jordan

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780807834022

Published to North Carolina Scholarship Online: July 2014

DOI: 10.5149/9780807838686_jordan

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The Bodies of Men

The Bodies of Men

The Negro's Physical Nature

Chapter:
(p.216) VI The Bodies of Men
Source:
White Over Black
Author(s):

Winthrop D. Jordan

Publisher:
University of North Carolina Press
DOI:10.5149/9780807838686_jordan.12

This chapter illustrates how success in conceptual and technological manipulation of their natural environment led Europeans increasingly to ponder their own place in Nature's scheme. Unless man was a disembodied spirit, it was essential that mankind be included in any assessment of the handiwork of God. By the eighteenth century, moreover, many men no longer fastened their eyes steadfastly upon the drama of salvation. Many intellectuals were ripe for a new center of interest which would bear the weight of their energy and curiosity; and their curiosity had been whetted by the flood of reports about strange-looking men in all quarters of the globe. During the sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries, the strange appearance of Indians and Negroes, and then of Malays and Lapps had of course attracted attention.

Keywords:   technological manipulation, natural environment, Europeans, salvation, intellectuals

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