Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
The Science of the Soul in Colonial New England$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Sarah Rivett

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780807835241

Published to North Carolina Scholarship Online: July 2014

DOI: 10.5149/9780807838709_Rivett

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA PRESS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.northcarolina.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of North Carolina Press, 2017. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CSO for personal use (for details see http://www.northcarolina.universitypressscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 21 November 2017

Deathbeds: Tokenography and the Science of Dying Well

Deathbeds: Tokenography and the Science of Dying Well

Chapter:
(p.173) 4 Deathbeds: Tokenography and the Science of Dying Well
Source:
The Science of the Soul in Colonial New England
Author(s):

Sarah Rivett

Publisher:
University of North Carolina Press
DOI:10.5149/northcarolina/9780807835241.003.0005

This chapter presents deathbed testimonies containing evidence of faith. Ministers and laypeople tried to capture the essence of divine revelation in the moment before death, especially those of women, of divine transition from death to life, from the visible to the invisible world, from the dark glass of limited perception to unfiltered revelation—and the promise of redemption that it held for the “meanest and lowest earthen vessels.” During this time, Richard Saunders's View of the Soul and Thomas Willis's Two Discourses concerning the Soul unearth the observational capacities needed to watch the actions of the spirit recorded in the dying person's optic nerve.

Keywords:   deathbed confessions, divine grace, ministers, laypeople, Richard Saunders, Thomas Willis

North Carolina Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .