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Writing Captivity in the Early Modern AtlanticCirculations of Knowledge and Authority in the Iberian and English Imperial Worlds$
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Lisa Voigt

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780807831991

Published to North Carolina Scholarship Online: July 2014

DOI: 10.5149/9780807838747_Knott

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: The Captive Subject & The Creole Author in Francisco Núñez de Pineda y Bascuñán's Cautiverio feliz y razón individual de las guerras dilatadas del reino de Chile

: The Captive Subject & The Creole Author in Francisco Núñez de Pineda y Bascuñán's Cautiverio feliz y razón individual de las guerras dilatadas del reino de Chile

Chapter:
(p.154) Chapter Three: The Captive Subject & The Creole Author in Francisco Núñez de Pineda y Bascuñán's Cautiverio feliz y razón individual de las guerras dilatadas del reino de Chile
Source:
Writing Captivity in the Early Modern Atlantic
Author(s):

Lisa Voigt

Publisher:
University of North Carolina Press
DOI:10.5149/northcarolina/9780807831991.003.0004

This chapter focuses on Francisco Nunez de Pineda y Bascunan, who spent much of his life petitioning authorities for compensation and rewards in light of his and his father's services to the Crown during the Araucanian wars in Chile. Although he was finally granted a privileged position as corregidor of the wealthy region of Moquegua at the ripe age of seventy-two, Pineda died before ever reaching it. As Jose Anadon writes in his biography of the Chilean soldier, “He died as a transient in distant lands.” Pineda's adult career as a “transient” far from his homeland seeking financial assistance recalls Garcilaso's relocation to Spain. Yet whereas Garcilaso presents both exile and captivity as potentially productive experiences, for Pineda, being forced to leave his patria is a far worse fate than the captivity he endured as a young man among the Mapuche, or Araucanian, Indians of southern Chile.

Keywords:   Francisco Nunez, Pineda y Bascunan, Araucanian wars, corregidor, Jose Anadon, Chilean soldier, transient

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