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Citizen SpectatorArt, Illusion, and Visual Perception in Early National America$
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Wendy Bellion

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780807833889

Published to North Carolina Scholarship Online: September 2014

DOI: 10.5149/9780807838907_Bellion

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PRINTED FROM UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA PRESS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.northcarolina.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of North Carolina Press, 2017. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CSO for personal use (for details see http://www.northcarolina.universitypressscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 19 November 2017

Introduction

Introduction

Chapter:
(p.1) Introduction
Source:
Citizen Spectator
Author(s):

Wendy Bellion

Publisher:
University of North Carolina Press
DOI:10.5149/northcarolina/9780807833889.003.0001

This book begins with a discussion of Charles Willson Peale's Artist in His Museum, which traditionally marks the end of an era. Huge in scale and dense with imagery, the painting offers both an autobiographical summary of Peale's talents and a calculated visualization of his renowned Philadelphia Museum. Surrounded by emblems of his achievements in art and science—a palette and brushes, excavated bones, a dead turkey draped over a taxidermy box—the elderly Peale lifts a heavy red curtain, his illuminated head bowed slightly in greeting and his palm extended in welcome. The curtain frames a view of the organized and impossibly deep space of the museum's Long Room, the main gallery on the second floor of the Pennsylvania State House.

Keywords:   Charles Willson Peale, Philadelphia Museum, Long Room, Pennsylvania State House

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