Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Citizen SpectatorArt, Illusion, and Visual Perception in Early National America$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Wendy Bellion

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780807833889

Published to North Carolina Scholarship Online: September 2014

DOI: 10.5149/9780807838907_Bellion

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA PRESS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.northcarolina.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of North Carolina Press, 2017. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CSO for personal use (for details see http://www.northcarolina.universitypressscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 11 December 2017

Theaters of Visuality

Theaters of Visuality

Chapter:
(p.23) 1 Theaters of Visuality
Source:
Citizen Spectator
Author(s):

Wendy Bellion

Publisher:
University of North Carolina Press
DOI:10.5149/northcarolina/9780807833889.003.0002

This chapter describes Charles Redheffer's unveiling of his invention—a perpetual motion machine. Such a discovery promised a technological marvel. The prospect of a self-renewing energy source was as much a hopeful desire of earlier centuries as it is today, and hence it was little surprise that Philadelphia's scientific and mechanic communities greeted the machine with wonder and excitement when it was exhibited at a house in Germantown, some ten miles outside the city. Eager to learn whether Redheffer's discovery could be replicated, a local group hired Lukens to construct a duplicate. Lukens was a clockmaker, a man practiced in the making of delicate things, and, turning an experienced eye on Redheffer's instrument, he quickly realized that his fellow mechanics had been fooled.

Keywords:   Charles Redheffer, perpetual motion machine, self-renewing energy source, Lukens

North Carolina Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .