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The Elusive West and the Contest for Empire, 1713-1763$
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Paul W. Mapp

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780807833957

Published to North Carolina Scholarship Online: July 2014

DOI: 10.5149/9780807838945_Mapp

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The Pacific Ocean and the War of the Spanish Succession

The Pacific Ocean and the War of the Spanish Succession

Chapter:
(p.122) 4 The Pacific Ocean and the War of the Spanish Succession
Source:
The Elusive West and the Contest for Empire, 1713-1763
Author(s):

Paul W. Mapp

Publisher:
University of North Carolina Press
DOI:10.5149/northcarolina/9780807833957.003.0005

This chapter argues that the antecedents to direct French trade with Peru and Chile in the first decades of the eighteenth century lay in the last three decades of the seventeenth. From the 1670s to the early 1690s, simultaneously pushed by imperial efforts to curtail Caribbean piracy and pulled by the lure of lightly guarded Spanish cities and treasure ships, buccaneers had journeyed into the Pacific by crossing the Isthmus of Panama or sailing around South America. They plagued the Americas' western shores, burning towns, taking ships, disrupting trade, and forcing the Spanish Empire to divert scarce pesos to defend a region usually protected by isolation. Ulloa remarked in his 1748 Voyage to South America that the city of Guayaquil still suffered from being pillaged by pirates in 1686. After sustaining numerous such costly attacks, Spain's Pacific colonies finally succeeded in the 1690s in driving the pirates away.

Keywords:   French trade, Peru, Chile, Caribbean piracy, treasure ships, Spanish Empire

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