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American Sugar KingdomThe Plantation Economy of the Spanish Caribbean, 1898-1934$
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Cesar J. Ayala

Print publication date: 1999

Print ISBN-13: 9780807847886

Published to North Carolina Scholarship Online: July 2014

DOI: 10.5149/9780807867976_ayala

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Labor and Migration

Labor and Migration

Chapter:
(p.148) 6 Labor and Migration
Source:
American Sugar Kingdom
Author(s):

César J. Ayala

Publisher:
University of North Carolina Press
DOI:10.5149/9780807867976_ayala.10

This chapter describes the expansion of the sugar industry in the Spanish Caribbean in the twentieth century. The change was so dramatic that it changed the economic balance between regions in each island, established new demographic patterns of settlement, and resulted in the settlement of lands that had hitherto remained largely depopulated. As new regions were opened up to the cultivation of sugar, the demand for labor, particularly in the agricultural phase of the process, which was labor intensive and required dedicated labor during the zafra, propelled workers into the new plantation zones. While the sugar industry experienced expansion everywhere, the supply of labor power for the plantations varied considerably from region to region.

Keywords:   sugar industry, Spanish Caribbean, economic balance, patterns of settlement, cultivation of sugar

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