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The Grimké Sisters from South CarolinaPioneers for Women's Rights and Abolition$
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Gerda Lerner

Print publication date: 2004

Print ISBN-13: 9780807855669

Published to North Carolina Scholarship Online: July 2014

DOI: 10.5149/9780807868096_lerner

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PRINTED FROM UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA PRESS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.northcarolina.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of North Carolina Press, 2018. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CSO for personal use (for details see http://www.northcarolina.universitypressscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 23 July 2018

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Chapter:
(p.87) 9
Source:
The Grimké Sisters from South Carolina
Author(s):

Gerda Lerner

Publisher:
University of North Carolina Press
DOI:10.5149/northcarolina/9780807855669.003.0009

In the mid-1830s, Angelina became fully committed to the cause of racial abolitionism. Gradually she was drawn deeper into the struggle. This chapter looks at how this happened and the effects this had on her. Sarah, at this time, still shied away from greater involvement in the antislavery movements, but there was one antislavery activity that she felt she could support, the Free Produce movement. The idea that slavery could be weakened by a boycott on slave-made products had originated with the Quaker John Woolman and the Presbyterian Benjamin Rush. This period was marked by a dramatic decision by the sisters: they became the first female abolitionist agents in the United States.

Keywords:   Angelina Grimké, antislavery movements, slavery, female abolitionists, John Woolman, Benjamin Rush

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