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Black Political Activism and the Cuban Republic$
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Melina Pappademos

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780807834909

Published to North Carolina Scholarship Online: July 2014

DOI: 10.5149/9780807869178_pappademos

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We Come to Discredit These Leaders

We Come to Discredit These Leaders

Political Change and Challenges to the Black Political Elite

Chapter:
(p.170) Chapter Six We Come to Discredit These Leaders
Source:
Black Political Activism and the Cuban Republic
Author(s):

Melina Pappademos

Publisher:
University of North Carolina Press
DOI:10.5149/9780807869178_pappademos.10

This chapter focuses on the eve of Cuba's first constitutional elections since Gerardo Machado took office in 1925, when the editors of Atomo, a new youth-run black newspaper, threw down the gauntlet. The editors called out the political machine that had dominated Cuban politics since the republic's inception and which had betrayed blacks: “There are those corrupted by experience . . . and their thirst for sinecures . . . who seek to . . . exploit the collective anguish of a Race.” Speaking to politicians of all colors generally and to black politicians in particular, Atomo's editors blasted Cuban leaders who placed their own individual interests above those of the racial collective. In leveling their accusation against black leaders, they also asserted their right to a more actualized relationship to kith and country.

Keywords:   constitutional elections, Cuba, Gerardo Machado, Atomo, black newspaper, political machine, Cuban politics

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