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Twelve Years a SlaveNarrative of Solomon Northup, a Citizen of New-York, Kidnapped in Washington City in 1841, and Rescued in 1853$
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Solomon Northup and David Wilson

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780807869437

Published to North Carolina Scholarship Online: July 2014

DOI: 10.5149/9780807869444_northup

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PRINTED FROM UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA PRESS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.northcarolina.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of North Carolina Press, 2018. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CSO for personal use (for details see www.northcarolina.universitypressscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 21 September 2018

[Page 250] Chapter XVIII.

[Page 250] Chapter XVIII.

Chapter:
(p.167) [Page 250] Chapter XVIII.
Source:
Twelve Years a Slave
Author(s):

Solomon Northup

Publisher:
University of North Carolina Press
DOI:10.5149/9780807869444_northup.21

This chapter describes how Wiley suffered severely at the hands of Master Epps, but in this respect he fared no worse than his unfortunate companions. “Spare the rod,” was an idea scouted by our master. He was constitutionally subject to periods of ill-humor, and at such times, however little provocation there might be, a certain amount of punishment was inflicted. The circumstances attending the last flogging but one that the author received will show how trivial a cause was sufficient with Epps for resorting to the whip. A Mr. O'Niel, residing in the vicinity of the Big Pine Woods, called upon Epps for the purpose of purchasing the author. He was a tanner and currier by occupation, transacting an extensive business, and intended to place the author at service in some department of his establishment.

Keywords:   Wiley, Master Epps, master, ill-humor, punishment, flogging, Mr. O'Niel, tanner

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