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Twelve Years a SlaveNarrative of Solomon Northup, a Citizen of New-York, Kidnapped in Washington City in 1841, and Rescued in 1853$
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Solomon Northup and David Wilson

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780807869437

Published to North Carolina Scholarship Online: July 2014

DOI: 10.5149/9780807869444_northup

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PRINTED FROM UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA PRESS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.northcarolina.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of North Carolina Press, 2017. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CSO for personal use (for details see http://www.northcarolina.universitypressscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 13 December 2017

[Page 28] Chapter II.

[Page 28] Chapter II.

Chapter:
(p.31) [Page 28] Chapter II.
Source:
Twelve Years a Slave
Author(s):

Solomon Northup

Publisher:
University of North Carolina Press
DOI:10.5149/9780807869444_northup.5

This chapter discusses the time when the author was met by two gentlemen of respectable appearance, both of whom were entirely unknown to him. The author had the impression that they were introduced to him by one of his acquaintances—precisely who, he has in vain endeavored to recall—with the remark that he was an expert player on the violin. At any rate, the gentlemen immediately entered into conversation on that subject, making numerous inquiries touching the author's proficiency in that respect. The author's responses being to all appearances satisfactory, the gentlemen proposed to engage his services for a short period, stating, at the same time, that he was just such a person as their business required.

Keywords:   acquaintances, expert player, violin, proficiency, two gentlemen

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