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White Ethnic New YorkJews, Catholics, and the Shaping of Postwar Politics$
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Joshua M. Zeitz

Print publication date: 2007

Print ISBN-13: 9780807830956

Published to North Carolina Scholarship Online: July 2014

DOI: 10.5149/9780807872802_zeitz

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Chapter:
(p.171) 7 Reaction
Source:
White Ethnic New York
Author(s):

Joshua M. Zeitz

Publisher:
University of North Carolina Press
DOI:10.5149/9780807872802_zeitz.11

The 1960s saw Jews and Catholics in New York City converge in their position on race relations. Both groups began the decade as strong supporters of integration but eventually turned into skeptics of its social value. There was a possibility that the city's Irish, Italian, and Jewish voters might forge a united electoral block and form a cross-ethnic backlash constituency. This did not happen, however. There was neither substantial defection by Jewish Democrats nor a sudden, fundamental political turn by Irish and Italian voters. This chapter examines the role played by race in New York's 1969 mayoral race that pitted John Lindsay, John Marchi, Mario Procaccino, Robert Wagner Jr., Herman Badillo, and novelist Norman Mailer. More specifically, it analyzed the trends in voting by Jews and Catholics during the elections.

Keywords:   race, Jews, Catholics, New York City, race relations, John Lindsay, John Marchi, Mario Procaccino, Robert Wagner Jr., elections

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