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Rome, the Greek World, and the EastVolume 3: The Greek World, the Jews, and the East$
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Fergus Millar, Hannah M. Cotton, and Guy MacLean Rogers

Print publication date: 2006

Print ISBN-13: 9780807830307

Published to North Carolina Scholarship Online: September 2014

DOI: 10.5149/9780807876657_millar

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The Problem of Hellenistic Syria*

The Problem of Hellenistic Syria*

Chapter:
(p.3) Chapter One The Problem of Hellenistic Syria*
Source:
Rome, the Greek World, and the East
Author(s):

Fergus Millar

Publisher:
University of North Carolina Press
DOI:10.5149/9780807876657_millar.7

This chapter investigates the problem of Hellenistic rule in Syria. In seeking the nature or limits of Hellenisation, it attempts to find evidence of continued survival of native cultures or fusion of Greek and native cultures, Greek or Macedonian military settlement in the surrounding territories, and changes in literacy. It first discusses excavations on several sites to find archaeological evidence of earlier Hellenistic periods: Samaria, Pella, Dura, and Epiphaneia. The chapter then illustrates the presence in Syria of Ptolemaic soldiers from various parts of the Greek world. The inscription from Ras Ibn Hani on the coast eight kilometres north of Laodicea records their presence. Excavations on this site have shown that a fortified Greek town was established there in the same period, probably by the Ptolemies.

Keywords:   Hellenistic rule, Syria, Hellinisation, native cultures, military settlement, literacy, Samaria, Pella, Dura, Epiphaneia

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