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Rome, the Greek World, and the EastVolume 3: The Greek World, the Jews, and the East$
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Fergus Millar, Hannah M. Cotton, and Guy MacLean Rogers

Print publication date: 2006

Print ISBN-13: 9780807830307

Published to North Carolina Scholarship Online: September 2014

DOI: 10.5149/9780807876657_millar

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The Phoenician Cities: A Case-Study of Hellenisation*

The Phoenician Cities: A Case-Study of Hellenisation*

Chapter:
(p.32) Chapter Two The Phoenician Cities: A Case-Study of Hellenisation*
Source:
Rome, the Greek World, and the East
Author(s):

Fergus Millar

Publisher:
University of North Carolina Press
DOI:10.5149/9780807876657_millar.8

This chapter presents a case study on the question of Hellenisation of the Phoenician Cities, where fusion of indigenous and Greek cultures seems to have taken place. It describes the two dimensions in the case of Phoenicia: the surviving effects of Phoenician colonisation; and the spread of Phoenician cultures inland as well as overseas. Although the archaeological record for this period is extremely poor, the chapter argues that three things can be done to illustrate the effects of Hellenism on ordinary life in Phoenicia: (1) to look at the continued use of Phoenician on formal inscriptions put up by individual Phoenicians abroad in the Hellenistic period; (2) to look at the evolution of the cities as communities; and (3) to ask if there was anything that resembled the continuous historical and religious tradition which is characteristic of Judaea.

Keywords:   Hellenisation, Phoenicia, Greek cultures, colonisation, Hellenism, Judaea

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