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Plain Folk's FightThe Civil War and Reconstruction in Piney Woods Georgia$
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Mark V. Wetherington

Print publication date: 2005

Print ISBN-13: 9780807829639

Published to North Carolina Scholarship Online: July 2014

DOI: 10.5149/9780807877043_wetherington

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Epilogue | Losing the Peace

Epilogue | Losing the Peace

Chapter:
(p.295) Epilogue | Losing the Peace
Source:
Plain Folk's Fight
Author(s):

Mark V. Wetherington

Publisher:
University of North Carolina Press
DOI:10.5149/9780807877043_wetherington.13

This Epilogue examines how Georgia's white plain folk responded to the Republicanism and New South industrialization that emerged after the Civil War in the context of Confederate defeat and sacrifice. It also describes the changes that occurred in the postwar period: households and neighborhoods were reconfigured, rural industrialization spawned railroads as well as towns and county seats, and a vibrant antebellum two-party political system was replaced by a single conservative Democratic Party. But some things remained unchanged: cotton production expanded, white tenancy increased, and a white patriarchy continued to rule local government. New South economics and politics created two opposing camps: the New South camp of men like Colonel Thomas Dawson and the reactionary and violent camp of men such as Lucius Williams.

Keywords:   plain folk, Georgia, Republicanism, New South, industrialization, Democratic Party, cotton production, economics, politics, railroads

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