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Declarations of DependenceThe Long Reconstruction of Popular Politics in the South, 1861-1908$
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Gregory Downs

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780807834442

Published to North Carolina Scholarship Online: July 2014

DOI: 10.5149/9780807877760_downs

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The Great Day of Acounter

The Great Day of Acounter

Democracy and the Problem of Power in Republican Reconstruction

Chapter:
(p.101) 4 The Great Day of Acounter
Source:
Declarations of Dependence
Author(s):

Gregory P. Downs

Publisher:
University of North Carolina Press
DOI:10.5149/9780807877760_downs.7

This chapter focuses on William Holden, who had been turned out of office only three years earlier. Starting in 1866, Holden adeptly read the transformations in Washington, ingratiated himself with Radical Republicans, and positioned himself atop the expanded democracy envisioned in congressional Reconstruction. By 1868, Holden rode back into the governor's office on heavy turnout by freedmen newly enfranchised by the state constitution and the insistence of Washington Radicals. Now incorporated into formal politics, these freedpeople pleaded to keep Holden's attention on the dire problems of security and survival. Building upon the petitions to the Freedmen's Bureau and to Lincoln, freedpeople and loyal whites created a fused language of individual dependence and group political power, tying their right to be heard to their votes, and fashioning a politics of dependence inside an expanding democracy.

Keywords:   William Holden, Radical Republicans, expanded democracy, congressional Reconstruction, freedmen

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