Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
A Cultural History of Cuba during the U.S. Occupation, 1898–1902$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Marial Iglesias Utset

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780807833988

Published to North Carolina Scholarship Online: July 2014

DOI: 10.5149/9780807877845_iglesias_utset

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA PRESS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.northcarolina.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of North Carolina Press, 2018. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CSO for personal use (for details see www.northcarolina.universitypressscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 19 December 2018

Attempts at Linguistic Colonization and the Struggle to Preserve Spanish

Attempts at Linguistic Colonization and the Struggle to Preserve Spanish

Anglicized Words and Expressions and Their Tropes

Chapter:
(p.65) Three Attempts at Linguistic Colonization and the Struggle to Preserve Spanish
Source:
A Cultural History of Cuba during the U.S. Occupation, 1898–1902
Author(s):

Marial Iglesias Utset

Publisher:
University of North Carolina Press
DOI:10.5149/9780807877845_iglesias_utset.7

This chapter describes how the notions of modernization filtering into Cuba from the United States carried with them a small universe of neologisms, whose function was both practical and symbolic: they gave names to experiences for which the old lexicon of colonial Cuba seemed to lack words. Overnight, in urban areas, barberias became “barber shops,” bodegas turned into “groceries,” and many merchants put up notices announcing, “English Spoken Here.” The use of words and phrases in English began to extend beyond middle- or upper-class circles. In this respect, baseball jargon functioned as a precursor. As the year 1898 got underway, even a devoted partisan of independence such as Maximo Gomez became interested in learning English.

Keywords:   notions of modernization, Cuba, United States, neologisms, old lexicon, colonial Cuba

North Carolina Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .