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Love's Whipping BoyViolence and Sentimentality in the American Imagination$
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Elizabeth Barnes

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780807834565

Published to North Carolina Scholarship Online: July 2014

DOI: 10.5149/9780807877968_barnes

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Wieland, Familicide, and the Suffering Father

Wieland, Familicide, and the Suffering Father

Chapter:
(p.25) Chapter 1 Wieland, Familicide, and the Suffering Father
Source:
Love's Whipping Boy
Author(s):

Elizabeth Barnes

Publisher:
University of North Carolina Press
DOI:10.5149/9780807877968_barnes.5

This chapter focuses on Mark Barton, a day trader who, after killing his wife, his eight-year-old daughter, and his twelve-year-old son with a hammer in July 1999, proceeded to shoot nine people at two different brokerage houses before shooting himself. His murderous “rampage” was attributed by the press to his newfound habit of day trading. In a letter of confession left at the family scene, Barton represents his violence as a legitimate expression not only of hatred but of devotion. As Barton has it, he murdered his children in an entirely different spirit, and with a different motive, than he murdered his fellow traders at the brokerage firms. The latter were those who deserved to die because they “greedily sought [his] destruction.”

Keywords:   Mark Barton, day trader, brokerage houses, murderous rampage, hatred, devotion

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