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Anetso, the Cherokee Ball GameAt the Center of Ceremony and Identity$
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Michael J. Zogry

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780807833605

Published to North Carolina Scholarship Online: July 2014

DOI: 10.5149/9780807898208_zogry

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Hani ! (Here!): Anetso as an Enduring Symbol of Cultural Identity in an Era of Great Change (1799–1838)

Hani ! (Here!): Anetso as an Enduring Symbol of Cultural Identity in an Era of Great Change (1799–1838)

Chapter:
(p.67) 2 Hani ! (Here!): Anetso as an Enduring Symbol of Cultural Identity in an Era of Great Change (1799–1838)
Source:
Anetso, the Cherokee Ball Game
Author(s):

Michael J. Zogry

Publisher:
University of North Carolina Press
DOI:10.5149/9780807898208_zogry.6

This chapter is an examination of anetso as an expression of Cherokee identity during the period between 1799 and 1836, beginning with the entrance of Christian missionaries into the Cherokee Nation and concluding with the forced removal known as the Trail of Tears. It uses written accounts from the period, primarily by missionaries, to gauge the significance of anetso as an important cultural activity. The chapter presents brief discussions of two events, the so-called “religious revivals” of 1811–13 and what is known as “White Path's rebellion,” from 1824 to 1827.

Keywords:   anetso, Cherokee, Christian missionaries, Cherokee Nation, Trail of Tears, religious revivals, White Path's rebellion

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