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Down the Wild Cape FearA River Journey through the Heart of North Carolina$
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Philip Gerard

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9781469602073

Published to North Carolina Scholarship Online: July 2014

DOI: 10.5149/9781469608129_Gerard

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PRINTED FROM UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA PRESS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.northcarolina.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of North Carolina Press, 2017. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CSO for personal use (for details see http://www.northcarolina.universitypressscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 11 December 2017

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Chapter:
(p.136) 8
Source:
Down the Wild Cape Fear
Author(s):

Philip Gerard

Publisher:
University of North Carolina Press
DOI:10.5149/northcarolina/9781469602073.003.0009

This chapter discusses the stately white riverfront mansion the expedition passed by near the southern end of the Wilmington waterfront, just below the shops and restaurants of Chandler's Wharf. The great house was built on the site of the first colonial customshouse, around 1825, by Edward B. Dudley, the first popularly elected governor of North Carolina. Dudley was a prime mover in establishing the city as a railroad hub. He invested the princely sum of $25,000—more than half a million dollars in today's currency—in the Wilmington and Weldon Railroad, which covered the incredible span of 1615 miles, and owned exactly twelve locomotives, all named after counties in eastern North Carolina. The Wilmington and Weldon would eventually play a crucial role in supplying Robert E. Lee's troops during the Civil War.

Keywords:   riverfront mansion, Wilmington waterfront, Chandler's Wharf, Robert E. Lee, Civil War

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