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Jim Crow WisdomMemory and Identity in Black America since 1940$

Jonathan Scott Holloway

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9781469610702

Published to North Carolina Scholarship Online: July 2014

DOI: 10.5149/9781469610719_Holloway

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(p.251) Bibliography

(p.251) Bibliography

Source:
Jim Crow Wisdom
Publisher:
University of North Carolina Press

Author Interviews

Benjamin, Richard. Liverpool, U.K., October 11, 2011.

Holloway, Wendell. Telephone interview, January 2010.

Methany, Zack. Greensboro, N.C., June 10, 2011.

Smith, Jacqueline. Memphis, Tenn., August 26, 2011.

Electronic Correspondence with the Author

Holloway, Brian. January 27, 28, 2010.

Holloway, Karen. January 28, 2010.

Holloway, Wendell. January 27, 2010.

Johnson, Chris. January 25, 2010.

Films

An Evening with Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater. Directed by Thomas Grimm, 1986.

The First World Festival of Negro Arts. Directed by William Greaves. USIA, 1966.

Greensboro: Closer to the Truth. Directed by Adam Zucker. 2007.

Shaft. Directed by Gordon Parks. Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, 1971.

Still a Brother: Inside the Negro Middle Class. Directed by William Greaves. NET, 1968.

Take This Hammer. Directed by Richard Moore. KQED, 1963.

Watermelon Man. Directed by Melvin Van Peebles. Columbia Pictures, 1970.

Unpublished Documents, Conference Proceedings, and Government Publications

Benjamin, Richard. “Exhibiting Sensitive Histories.” Federation of International Human Rights Museums Conference, September 15, 2010.

“A Day in the Life of a Slave.” Magnolia Mound Plantation lesson plan, n.d.

“Interpretation of Plantation Slavery Conference, May 2–3.” Internal memorandum, May 14, 2008.

“Louisiana African American Heritage Trail.” Louisiana Department of Culture, Recreation, and Tourism. Planning document, n.d.

Magnolia Mound Plantation Tour Script. July 22, 2009.

(p.252) “What Are We Saying? Discovering How People of African Descent Are Interpreted at Louisiana Plantation Sites.” LSU Rural Life Museum Conference, 2008.

Articles and Essays

Adamic, Louis. “There Are Whites and Whites.” Negro Digest, March 1946, 47–50.

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“Backstage.” Ebony, November 1945, 2.

Bailey, Charles W. “How Washington Insiders Ambushed Mickey Mouse—Fight against the Building of a Theme Park in Virginia by Walt Disney Co.” Washington Monthly 26, no. 12 (December 1994): 10–14.

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Baraka, Ameer. “The Black Aesthetic.” Negro Digest, September 1969, 5–6.

Bell, Derrick. “The Price and Pain of Racial Perspective.” Stanford Law School Journal, May 9, 1986.

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“Black Student Demands.” Northwestern University, April 22, 1968.

In The University Crisis Reader, edited by Immanuel Wallerstein and Paul Starr. Vol. 1, The Liberal University under Attack, 297–98. New York: Random House, 1971.

Blassingame, John. “Black Autobiographies as History and Literature.” Black Scholar 5, no. 4 (December 1973–January 1974): 2–9.

“Bonanza for Dixie Libraries.” Negro Digest, August 1946, back cover.

Borgese, G. A. “A Bedroom Approach to Racism.” Negro Digest, December 1944, 31–35.

Bourne, St. Clair. “Interview.” In Struggles for Representation: African American Documentary Film and Video, edited by Phyllis R. Klotman and Janet K. Cutler, 334–37. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1999.

Bowser, Pearl. “Pioneers of Black Documentary Film.” In Struggles for Representation: African American Documentary Film and Video, edited by Phyllis R. Klotman and Janet K. Cutler, 8–30. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1999.

Brundage, W. Fitzhugh. “No Deed but Memory.” In Where These Memories Grow: History, Memory, and Southern Identity, edited by W. Fitzhugh Brundage, 1–28. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2000.

Bruner, Edward L. “Tourism in Ghana: The Representation of Slavery and the Return of the Black Diaspora.” American Anthropologist 98, no. 2 (June 1996): 290–304.

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Carson, Cary. “Colonial Williamsburg and the Practice of Interpretive Planning in American History Museums.” Public Historian 20, no. 3 (Summer 1998): 11–51.

Carson, Clayborne. “A Scholar in Struggle.” Souls 4, no. 2 (2002): 28–37.

Cass, James. “Can the University Survive the Black Challenge?” In Basic Black: A Look at the Black Presence in the University Community, edited by John Buerk et al., 45–56. Melrose, Mass.: Keating & Joyce, 1970.

Clark, Cedric. “On Racism and Racist Systems.” Negro Digest, August 1969, 4–8.

Clark, Kenneth. “Letter of Resignation from Board of Directors of Antioch College.” In Black Studies: Myths & Realities, by Kilson Martin, C. Vann Woodward, Kenneth B. Clark, Thomas Sowell, Roy Wilkins, Andrew F. Brimmer, and Norman Hill, 33–34. New York: A. Philip Randolph Educational Fund, 1969.

Couch, W. T. “Publisher's Introduction.” In What the Negro Wants, edited by Rayford Logan, ix–xxiii. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1944.

Craig, Bruce. “Historical Advocacy: The Past, Present, and Future.” Public Historian 22, no. 2 (Spring 2000): 71–74.

Crespi, Muriel. “A Brief Ethnography of Magnolia Plantation: Planning for Cane River Creole National Historical Park.” National Park Service, 2004.

Cruse, Harold. “Black Studies: Interpretation, Methodology, and the Relationship to Social Movements.” Afro-American Studies 2, no. 1 (June 1971): 15–51.

Cutler, Janet K. “Rewritten on Film: Documenting the Artist.” In Struggles for Representation: African American Documentary Film and Video, edited by Phyllis R. Klotman and Janet K. Cutler, 151–210. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1999.

Dailey, Jane. “The Limits of Liberalism in the New South: The Politics of Race, Sex, and Patronage in Virginia, 1879–1883.” In Jumpin' Jim Crow: Southern Politics from Civil War to Civil Rights, edited by Jane Dailey, Glenda Elizabeth Gilmore, and Bryant Simon, 88–114. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2000.

Daveson, Kathleen. “Letters and Pictures to the Editor.” Ebony, May 1946, 50.

Davis, Arthur P. “My Most Humiliating Jim Crow Experience.” Negro Digest, May 1944, 61–62.

Davis, David Brion. “Reflections.” In Black Studies in the University: A Symposium, edited by Armstead Robinson, Craig Foster, and Donald Ogilvie, 215–24. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1968.

Davis, Frank Marshall. “My Most Humiliating Jim Crow Experience.” Negro Digest, September 1944, 57–58.

Dwyer, Owen J. “Interpreting the Civil Rights Movement: Contradiction, Confirmation, and the Cultural Landscape.” In The Civil Rights Movement in American Memory, edited by Renee C. Romano and Leigh Raiford, 5–27. Athens: University of Georgia Press, 2006.

Earley, Tony. “Introduction.” In Somehow Form a Family: Stories That Are Mostly True, xv–xvi. Chapel Hill: Algonquin Books, 2001.

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———. “Richard Wright's Blues.” In Shadow and Act, 77–94. 1964. Reprint, New York: Vintage, 1972.

Embree, Edwin R. “Basic Steps toward Democracy.” Pittsburgh Courier, December 12, 1943, 3.

Eskew, Glenn T. “Selling the Civil Rights Movement: Montgomery, Alabama, since the 1960s.” In Dixie Emporium: Tourism, Foodways, and Consumer Culture in the American South, edited by Anthony J. Stanonis, 175–202. Athens: University of Georgia Press, 2008.

“Evict Negro Soldier Even from Jim-Crow Seat in Bus.” Pittsburgh Courier, November 21, 1942, 2.

Eyerman, Ron. “Cultural Trauma: Slavery and the Formation of African American Identity.” In Cultural Trauma and Collective Identity, edited by Jeffrey Alexander, Ron Eyerman, Bernhard Giesen, Neil Smelser, and Piotr Sztompka, 60–111. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2004.

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Feather, Leonard. “Wanted: A White Mammy.” Negro Digest, November 1945, 45–47.

Field, Marshall. “The Color of Injustice.” Negro Digest, June 1945, 31–32.

Fleming, G. James. “My Most Humiliating Jim Crow Experience.” Negro Digest, June 1945, 67–68.

Foley, Barbara. “History, Fiction, and the Ground Between: The Uses of the Documentary Mode in Black Literature.” PMLA 95, no. 3 (May 1980): 389–403.

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———. “What Should Be the Role of Afro-American Education in the Undergraduate Curriculum?” In Basic Black: A Look at the Black Presence in the University Community, edited by John Buerk et al., 15–24. Melrose, Mass.: Keating & Joyce, 1970.

Harris, Robert L., Jr. “We Can Best Honor the Past … by Facing It Squarely, Honestly, and Above All, Openly.” Journal of African American History 94, no. 3 (Summer 2009): 391–97.

Heningburg, Alphonse, and Edwin Embree. “Letters and Pictures to the Editor.” Ebony, December 1945, 51.

———. “Letters and Pictures to the Editor.” Ebony, January 1946, 51.

Holloway, Jonathan Scott. “The Black Intellectual and the ‘Crisis Canon’ in the Twentieth Century.” Black Scholar, Spring 2001, 2–13.

———. “Editor's Introduction.” In A Brief and Tentative Analysis of Negro Leadership, by Ralph J. Bunche, 1–28. New York: New York University Press, 2005.

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Hurst, Fannie. “The Sure Way to Equality.” Negro Digest, June 1946, 27–28.

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(p.256) ———. “New Topic for Black Studies Debate, Latinos.” New York Times, February 1, 2003, A1.

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Websites

“A Bench by the Road.” World: Journal of the Unitarian Universalist Association 3, no. 1 (January/February 1989): 4–5, 37–41. http://www.uuworld.org/ideas/articles/117810.shtml.

“Bench by the Road Project.” The Official Website of the Toni Morrison Society. http://www.tonimorrisonsociety.org/bench.html.

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Dissertations

Rose, Julia. “Rethinking Representations of Slave Life at Historical Plantation Museums: Towards a Commemorative Museum Pedagogy.” Louisiana State University, 2006.

Shaw, Patricia. “‘Negro Digest,’ ‘Pulse,’ and ‘Headlines and Pictures’: African American Periodicals as Informants, Morale Builders, and Articulators of Protest during World War II.” University of Maryland, College Park, 1994. (p.268)