Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Modern Manhood and the Boy Scouts of America"Citizenship, Race, and the Environment, 1910-1930"$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Benjamin René Jordan

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9781469627656

Published to North Carolina Scholarship Online: September 2016

DOI: 10.5149/northcarolina/9781469627656.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA PRESS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.northcarolina.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of North Carolina Press, 2017. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CSO for personal use (for details see http://www.northcarolina.universitypressscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 18 November 2017

Epilogue

Epilogue

Scout Manhood and Citizenship in the Great Depression

Chapter:
(p.214) Epilogue
Source:
Modern Manhood and the Boy Scouts of America
Author(s):

Benjamin René Jordan

Publisher:
University of North Carolina Press
DOI:10.5149/northcarolina/9781469627656.003.0009

The Great Depression undercut funding for Scout offices and troops, but the organization managed to increase its membership by emphasizing the Daily Good Turn to those in need and expanded camping opportunities such as the new Philmont high adventure camp and the National Jamboree. The Boy Scouts created a new Cub Scout program for younger boys and also partnered with the federal government’s Indian Bureau to establish more than one hundred troops of Native American Boy Scouts at reservation boarding schools. The elaborately-decorated and symbolic Philadelphia Scout council office building, built in the Great Depression with great pride as a monument to the organization’s ability to teach good character and civic responsibility to all American boys, came under public scrutiny in the 1990s as former gay Boy Scouts and leaders attempted to force the city to remove the organization from its local office since it was built on city park land. While the city eventually reached an agreement to pay the local council for previous upkeep costs in exchange for vacating the building, recent shifts in Scout national membership policies to permit openly gay boys and leaders fits with the organization’s culturally inclusive membership heritage from its first three decades.

Keywords:   Great Depression, Good Turn, Philmont, National Jamboree, Cub Scout, Native American Boy Scout, Indian Bureau, Philadelphia Scout council, Gay Boy Scout

North Carolina Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .