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Depression FolkGrassroots Music and Left-Wing Politics in 1930s America$
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Ronald D. Cohen

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9781469628813

Published to North Carolina Scholarship Online: January 2017

DOI: 10.5149/northcarolina/9781469628813.001.0001

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Chapter:
(p.118) Chapter Seven Decade Ends
Source:
Depression Folk
Author(s):

Ronald D. Cohen

Publisher:
University of North Carolina Press
DOI:10.5149/northcarolina/9781469628813.003.0008

Folk music performance and collecting entered the waning year of the 1930s with somewhat renewed vigor but with reduced federal government support. Of increasing importance, a group of professional musicians, including Woody Guthrie, Lead Belly, Burl Ives, and Josh White, emerged to capture a popular interest in folk music, particularly in New York City. Alan Lomax’s CBS programs brought a variety of folk performers into homes and schools throughout the country, and the music’s connection to the Communist Party and organized labor continued as the country edged closer to war. At the same time anti-communism was on the rise.

Keywords:   Alan Lomax, Woody Guthrie, Pete Seeger, Paul Robeson, Earl Robinson, Anti-Communist politics

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