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Pressed for All TimeProducing the Great Jazz Albums from Louis Armstrong and Billie Holiday to Miles Davis and Diana Krall$
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Michael Jarrett

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9781469630588

Published to North Carolina Scholarship Online: May 2017

DOI: 10.5149/northcarolina/9781469630588.001.0001

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Rolling Tape

Rolling Tape

Producing Jazz LPs, 1950–1966

Chapter:
(p.22) 2 Rolling Tape
Source:
Pressed for All Time
Author(s):

Michael Jarrett

Publisher:
University of North Carolina Press
DOI:10.5149/northcarolina/9781469630588.003.0003

The A&R man became a record producer with the development of magnetic tape (a spoil of World War II) and the introduction of the vinyl long-playing record by Columbia Records in 1948. Producers could capture on tape—for reproduction and sale on records—jazz that had routinely happened for many years only on various stages. When recording technology caught up with the actual practice of improvising musicians, jazz discovered an ideal form in the "album." George Avakian's visionary work with Duke Ellington, Miles Davis, Erroll Garner, Buck Clayton, and Dave Brubeck realized what could be done with the new format and technology. The productions of Milt Gabler, Bob Weinstock, Esmond Edwards, Don Schlitten Teo Macero, Bob Thiele, Orrin Keepnews, Nesuhi Ertegun, Creed Taylor, Lester Koenig, Nat Hentoff ushered in a golden age for jazz.

Keywords:   Jazz record production, Advent of magnetic tape, A&R (artists and repertoire), Recording jazz musicians, History of jazz (classic jazz), Creating and packaging record albums, Recording technologies (monophonic tape), Interviews with producers, Oral histories

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