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City in a GardenEnvironmental Transformations and Racial Justice in Twentieth-Century Austin, Texas$
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Andrew M. Busch

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9781469632643

Published to North Carolina Scholarship Online: January 2018

DOI: 10.5149/northcarolina/9781469632643.001.0001

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Building a City of Upper-Middle-Class Citizens

Building a City of Upper-Middle-Class Citizens

Urban Renewal and the Racial Limits of Liberalism

Chapter:
(p.133) 6 Building a City of Upper-Middle-Class Citizens
Source:
City in a Garden
Author(s):

Andrew M. Busch

Publisher:
University of North Carolina Press
DOI:10.5149/northcarolina/9781469632643.003.0007

This chapter explores intensifying segregation in the postwar era and argues that segregation was an important component of the city’s growth model. Even in a relatively liberal city like Austin, racial relations took a backseat to economic and demographic growth. City leaders used federally-sponsored urban renewal to remake the landscape, but doing so necessitated dispossessing thousands of minorities and destroying their neighborhoods. African Americans, in particular, had trouble finding new homes. By the 1970s Austin was more segregated than at any time before.

Keywords:   urban renewal, segregation, housing

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