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White Over BlackAmerican Attitudes toward the Negro, 1550-1812$
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Winthrop D. Jordan

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780807834022

Published to North Carolina Scholarship Online: July 2014

DOI: 10.5149/9780807838686_jordan

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Anxious Oppressors

Anxious Oppressors

Freedom and Control in a Slave Society

Chapter:
(p.101) III Anxious Oppressors
Source:
White Over Black
Author(s):

Winthrop D. Jordan

Publisher:
University of North Carolina Press
DOI:10.5149/9780807838686_jordan.9

This chapter argues that the demographic pattern of European and African settlement in the seaboard colonies was basic to the emergent pattern of master-slave relations. Despite the crucial and at times determinative influence of this pattern, the varying degrees of rigor which slavery exhibited in various regions did more than reflect population ratios: in their enactment and application the laws of slavery reflected the complex needs and responses of communities which for varying reasons were both different and roughly similar to each other. White reactions to manifestations of slave discontent, especially, seem to have differed in ways which suggest that the measure of communal integration among white men was crucial to the shape of their response.

Keywords:   demographic pattern, African settlement, seaboard colonies, master-slave relations, slavery

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