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Out on AssignmentNewspaper Women and the Making of Modern Public Space$
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Alice Fahs

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780807834961

Published to North Carolina Scholarship Online: September 2014

DOI: 10.5149/9780807869031_fahs

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Among the Newspaper Women

Among the Newspaper Women

Chapter:
(p.17) Chapter One Among the Newspaper Women
Source:
Out on Assignment
Author(s):

Alice Fahs

Publisher:
University of North Carolina Press
DOI:10.5149/9780807869031_fahs.4

This chapter shows that, as early as the mid-1880s, women began moving into metropolitan newspaper work in increasing—and increasingly visible—numbers. “There is a large number of women in New York who support themselves by writing for the newspapers, daily and weekly,” wrote Martha Louise Rayne in her 1884 guide What Can a Woman Do; or, Her Position in the Business and Literary World. The Journalist, a New York trade journal, estimated in 1888 that about two hundred women were working for New York newspapers alone, and many commentators noted that most local papers employed one or two women during the same period. By 1889, women had become so visible in newspaper work that the Journalist devoted a special issue to their achievements. Women were “firmly established in their position in journalistic work,” the same periodical commented in 1891.

Keywords:   metropolitan newspaper work, New York, Martha Louise Rayne, trade journal, local papers, journalistic work

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