Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Forging FreedomBlack Women and the Pursuit of Liberty in Antebellum Charleston$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Amrita Chakrabarti Myers

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780807835050

Published to North Carolina Scholarship Online: July 2014

DOI: 10.5149/9780807869093_myers

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA PRESS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.northcarolina.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of North Carolina Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in NCSO for personal use.date: 31 March 2020

THE Currency OF Citizenship

THE Currency OF Citizenship

Property Ownership and Black Female Freedom

Chapter:
(p.113) Chapter 4 THE Currency OF Citizenship
Source:
Forging Freedom
Author(s):

Amrita Chakrabarti Myers

Publisher:
University of North Carolina Press
DOI:10.5149/9780807869093_myers.8

This chapter discusses the lawsuit Eliza Seymour Lee initiated against fellow Charlestonian Henry Gourdin. A respected businesswoman, Eliza and her husband, John, had owned the city's two most illustrious hotels for decades, lodgings that catered to prominent whites from across the nation and around the world. By the 1850s, Eliza was a wealthy widow with ties to Charleston's white elites, and she oversaw her business affairs with the help of Henry Gourdin, whom she hired to help manage her finances. A prominent attorney, Henry appeared happy to take Eliza on as a client. Their relationship soured, however, when Eliza discovered certain irregularities with her portfolio. Confronting Henry and getting nowhere, and determined to protect her property rights, Eliza sued him for fraud and embezzlement.

Keywords:   Eliza Seymour Lee, Charlestonian, Henry Gourdin, respected businesswoman, wealthy widow, white elites

North Carolina Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .