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Sustaining the Cherokee FamilyKinship and the Allotment of an Indigenous Nation$
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Rose Stremlau

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780807834992

Published to North Carolina Scholarship Online: July 2014

DOI: 10.5149/9780807869109_stremlau

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PRINTED FROM UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA PRESS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.northcarolina.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of North Carolina Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in NCSO for personal use.date: 17 October 2019

Sustaining

Sustaining

Chapter:
(p.215) Chapter Eight Sustaining
Source:
Sustaining the Cherokee Family
Author(s):

Rose Stremlau

Publisher:
University of North Carolina Press
DOI:10.5149/9780807869109_stremlau.12

This chapter discusses how J. W. Tyner crisscrossed northeastern Oklahoma documenting Cherokee life after allotment as part of the American Indian Oral History Project, commonly known as the Doris Duke Collection after the foundation that sponsored this massive undertaking. Tyner, a Cherokee from Adair County, conducted many of his interviews with elders while driving in his car. Cruising through the back roads of the western Ozarks, his passengers talked about the journeys of their lifetimes. They told stories of what had changed, but mostly they talked about what remained the same and important: family and the land that sustained them. The countryside itself testified to this. The landscape still bore the names of Cherokee families that had lived there at the beginning of the twentieth century when the Cherokee Nation was allotted and, in many cases, continued to live there.

Keywords:   J. W. Tyner, Cherokee life, American Indian Oral History Project, Doris Duke Collection, Cherokee Nation

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