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Boston Against BusingRace, Class, and Ethnicity in the 1960s and 1970s$
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Ronald P. Formisano

Print publication date: 2004

Print ISBN-13: 9780807855263

Published to North Carolina Scholarship Online: July 2014

DOI: 10.5149/9780807869703_formisano

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Democracy and Segregation, 1961–1965

Democracy and Segregation, 1961–1965

Chapter:
(p.22) 2 Democracy and Segregation, 1961–1965
Source:
Boston Against Busing
Author(s):

Ronald P. Formisano

Publisher:
University of North Carolina Press
DOI:10.5149/9780807869703_formisano.6

This chapter discusses the memorial service in Boston for the late President Kennedy that was attended by a pantheon of political and religious celebrities. Catholic, Protestant, and Jewish clergy joined together in honoring the native son, and a venerable Boston historian thought he saw in the proceedings “the spirit of Bishop Cheverus and his neighbors of the first quarter of the nineteenth century. . . . The memory of John F. Kennedy had reunited Boston.” Later that year, however, a black Roxbury mother observed sadly about Boston: “I used to feel that things like boycotts and demonstrations belonged in Birmingham and Mississippi. Now I know that . . . this is the Boston problem as well, here in the deep North.”

Keywords:   memorial service, Boston, religious celebrities, Jewish clergy, native son, Bishop Cheverus, John F. Kennedy

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