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Into the PulpitSouthern Baptist Women and Power since World War II$
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Elizabeth H. Flowers

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780807835340

Published to North Carolina Scholarship Online: July 2014

DOI: 10.5149/9780807869987_flowers

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PRINTED FROM UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA PRESS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.northcarolina.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of North Carolina Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in NCSO for personal use.date: 22 September 2021

Into the Center Pulpit: A Dangerous Dream

Into the Center Pulpit: A Dangerous Dream

Chapter:
(p.27) 1 Into the Center Pulpit: A Dangerous Dream
Source:
Into the Pulpit
Author(s):

Elizabeth H. Flowers

Publisher:
University of North Carolina Press
DOI:10.5149/9780807869987_flowers.5

After World War II, newfound prosperity enabled the leaders of the Southern Baptist Convention (SBC) in making the SBC into the largest Protestant denomination nationwide. This chapter considers the years from 1945 to 1972, a period of prosperity and nationalization of the South after World War II. It describes the economic prosperity that transformed the postwar South, and the cultural changes that brought anxiety and fear to Southern Baptists. During the 1960s, SBC leaders found it increasingly difficult to contain tensions. Issues about biblical inerrancy swept the SBC and seemed to rip Southern Baptists apart, but it soon became apparent that they were entangled in cultural conflicts involving race and gender that remained deep and persistent in SBC.

Keywords:   World War II, Southern Baptist Convention, SBC, South, Southern Baptists, biblical inerrancy, race, gender

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