Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Creating ConsumersHome Economists in Twentieth-Century America$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Carolyn M. Goldstein

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780807835531

Published to North Carolina Scholarship Online: July 2014

DOI: 10.5149/9780807872383_goldstein

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA PRESS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.northcarolina.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of North Carolina Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in NCSO for personal use.date: 31 March 2020

Creating a Science of Consumption at the Bureau of Home Economics, 1920–1940

Creating a Science of Consumption at the Bureau of Home Economics, 1920–1940

Chapter:
(p.62) 2 Creating a Science of Consumption at the Bureau of Home Economics, 1920–1940
Source:
Creating Consumers
Author(s):

Carolyn M. Goldstein

Publisher:
University of North Carolina Press
DOI:10.5149/9780807872383_goldstein.6

The establishment of the Bureau of Home Economics (BHE) in 1923 provided home economists with a higher degree of authority that allowed women in the field to confirm their status as experts not only in food and nutrition but also in household goods. Under the bureau's first director, Louise Stanley, a pioneering generation of home economists initiated the development of a federal information clearinghouse in the service of consumers. This chapter examines the bureau's origins, its function as a training ground for home economists, and its efforts to develop a research agenda specializing in the user's perspective on consumer products as well as the study of consumers themselves. It also analyzes how the influence of women in BHE worked in reforming consumer behavior.

Keywords:   Bureau of Home Economics, BHE, food, nutrition, household goods, Louise Stanley, consumer behavior

North Carolina Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .