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Creating ConsumersHome Economists in Twentieth-Century America$
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Carolyn M. Goldstein

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780807835531

Published to North Carolina Scholarship Online: July 2014

DOI: 10.5149/9780807872383_goldstein

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Identity Crisis and Confusion: Home Economics and Social Change, 1950–1975

Identity Crisis and Confusion: Home Economics and Social Change, 1950–1975

Chapter:
(p.282) 8 Identity Crisis and Confusion: Home Economics and Social Change, 1950–1975
Source:
Creating Consumers
Author(s):

Carolyn M. Goldstein

Publisher:
University of North Carolina Press
DOI:10.5149/9780807872383_goldstein.12

This chapter explores the impact of the consumer and feminist movements of the 1950s, 1960s, and 1970s on home economists' identity as consumer experts and representatives of the “woman's viewpoint”. Challenges to the profession intensified as members of the baby boomer generation questioned the middle-class norms of consumption with which home economists had become so closely identified. It was during this period that two additional social movements emerged: consumerism and civil rights. Eventually, the home economics movement petered out and understanding of women in the field as consumer advocates or representatives declined.

Keywords:   consumer, feminist movements, consumer experts, consumerism, civil rights, home economics

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