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Terms of InclusionBlack Intellectuals in Twentieth-Century Brazil$
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Paulina L. Alberto

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780807834374

Published to North Carolina Scholarship Online: September 2014

DOI: 10.5149/9780807877715_alberto

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. Difference

. Difference

São Paulo, Rio de Janeiro, and Salvador da Bahia, 1950–1964

Chapter:
(p.196) 5. Difference
Source:
Terms of Inclusion
Author(s):

Paulina L. Alberto

Publisher:
University of North Carolina Press
DOI:10.5149/9780807877715_alberto.10

This chapter discusses the problem with negro theater, negro newspapers, and negro clubs. It was not just that they undermined the idea that Brazil was truly a society without racism and therefore without need for social transformation. Perhaps more ominously, groups or publications built around distinctly negro racial identities threatened the increasingly widespread idea of a unified Brazilian identity blessed by the absence of racial divisions. At midcentury, this idea was dear not just to conservatives like the Globo editorialist, who, from the extreme position of denying that Brazil ever had racism, saw negro organizations of any kind as out of place and even treasonous. It was also dear to moderate and progressive social scientists committed to democracy and antiracism, and even to leftist thinkers and politicians who aspired to foment cross-racial alliances among the Brazilian povo.

Keywords:   negro theater, negro newspapers, negro clubs, racism, social transformation, racial identities

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