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Terms of InclusionBlack Intellectuals in Twentieth-Century Brazil$
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Paulina L. Alberto

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780807834374

Published to North Carolina Scholarship Online: September 2014

DOI: 10.5149/9780807877715_alberto

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Epilogue: Brazil, 1985 to the New Century

Epilogue: Brazil, 1985 to the New Century

Chapter:
(p.297) Epilogue: Brazil, 1985 to the New Century
Source:
Terms of Inclusion
Author(s):

Paulina L. Alberto

Publisher:
University of North Carolina Press
DOI:10.5149/9780807877715_alberto.12

This chapter discusses the new generation of black thinkers and activists across Brazil that revised their relationship with dominant racial ideologies, rejecting the shared symbols that, in different iterations, had served as the centerpiece of black politics since the First Republic. After 1985 the return to democracy gave black activists the openings they needed to make their denunciation of the “myth” of racial democracy increasingly visible in Brazilian public life. The period of democratic transition in the mid-1980s, like the transition to democracy in the mid-1940s, was a propitious time to question an ideology that had become so closely associated with a discredited dictatorship. It was also, as at midcentury, a time of growth for black cultural and political organizations. In this new environment black groups were able to push for, and frequently win, legal prohibitions against racial discrimination as part of the rebuilding of democratic institutions.

Keywords:   black thinkers, racial ideologies, black politics, First Republic, black activists, racial democracy

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