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The Senator and the SharecropperThe Freedom Struggles of James O. Eastland and Fannie Lou Hamer$
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Chris Myers Asch

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780807872024

Published to North Carolina Scholarship Online: July 2014

DOI: 10.5149/9780807878057_asch

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“No One Can Honestly Say Negroes Are Satisfied”: The Sharecropper Embraces the Movement

“No One Can Honestly Say Negroes Are Satisfied”: The Sharecropper Embraces the Movement

Chapter:
(p.167) 6 “No One Can Honestly Say Negroes Are Satisfied”: The Sharecropper Embraces the Movement
Source:
The Senator and the Sharecropper
Author(s):

Chris Myers Asch

Publisher:
University of North Carolina Press
DOI:10.5149/9780807878057_asch.10

This chapter describes how Ruleville has changed a fair bit since the days of Fannie Lou Hamer and James Eastland. The population has swelled as plantation workers abandoned the countryside in the mid-twentieth century, and the town now boasts more than three thousand people, about the size of Indianola a century earlier. As in the rest of America, chain stores, including Dollar General and Double Quick, have replaced family-run businesses. It's gone now, but on the right-hand side of the road there used to be a small convenience store run by Roy Bryant, one of Emmett Till's murderers, who found refuge in Ruleville and lived there until he died in 1994. Few blacks in town lamented his passing.

Keywords:   Ruleville, family-run businesses, James Eastland, plantation workers, Roy Bryant, Emmett Till

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