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Death in LifeSurvivors of Hiroshima$
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Robert Jay Lifton

Print publication date: 1991

Print ISBN-13: 9780807843444

Published to North Carolina Scholarship Online: July 2014

DOI: 10.5149/9780807882894_lifton

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Formulation: Self and World

Formulation: Self and World

Chapter:
(p.367) Nine Formulation: Self and World
Source:
Death in Life
Author(s):

Robert Jay Lifton

Publisher:
University of North Carolina Press
DOI:10.5149/9780807882894_lifton.13

This chapter defines formulation as the path beyond anger. Here, formulation does not mean detached theories about the atomic bomb, but rather the process by which the hibakusha recreates himself—establishes those inner forms that can serve as a bridge between self and world. Ideology and “world view” are central to the process, and by studying their relationship to Abomb mastery, we gain a sense of their significance for mental life in general. Formulation includes efforts to reestablish three essential elements of psychic function: the sense of connection, of organic relationship to the people as well as nonhuman elements in one's life space, whether immediate or distant and imagined; the sense of symbolic integrity, of the cohesion and significance of one's life, here including some form of transcendence of the Abomb experience; and the sense of movement, of development and change, in the continuous struggle between fixed identity and individuation.

Keywords:   formulation, anger, mental life, atomic bomb, hibakusha, world view, ideology

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