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Death in LifeSurvivors of Hiroshima$
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Robert Jay Lifton

Print publication date: 1991

Print ISBN-13: 9780807843444

Published to North Carolina Scholarship Online: July 2014

DOI: 10.5149/9780807882894_lifton

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Residual Struggles: Trust, Peace, And Mastery

Residual Struggles: Trust, Peace, And Mastery

Chapter:
(p.253) Seven Residual Struggles: Trust, Peace, And Mastery
Source:
Death in Life
Author(s):

Robert Jay Lifton

Publisher:
University of North Carolina Press
DOI:10.5149/9780807882894_lifton.11

This chapter shows how the limited attainments of Abomb leaders suggest the depth of residual conflict. The conflict has existed within individual hibakusha, in the general Hiroshima community, and, in fact, throughout all of post-bomb society. Hibakusha struggles to absorb their experience are therefore problems of psychohistorical mastery. The contending symbols within and around hibakusha are those which affirm life and those which subvert it; the polarity is that of reintegration versus residual distrust. For individual hibakusha the experience of being loved and cared for could, gradually and against obstacles, recreate life-affirming imagery and reestablish the capacity to live. Sensitivities about counterfeit nurturance were also extremely strong in all children forced to depend upon special care, particularly care coming from city or government agencies.

Keywords:   Abomb leaders, residual conflict, hibakusha, Hiroshima community, post-bomb society

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