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Linthead StompThe Creation of Country Music in the Piedmont South$
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Patrick Huber

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780807832257

Published to North Carolina Scholarship Online: July 2014

DOI: 10.5149/9780807886786_huber

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PRINTED FROM UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA PRESS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.northcarolina.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of North Carolina Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in NCSO for personal use.date: 21 October 2019

Epilogue

Epilogue

Chapter:
(p.275) Epilogue
Source:
Linthead Stomp
Author(s):

Patrick Huber

Publisher:
University of North Carolina Press
DOI:10.5149/9780807886786_huber.9

This book concludes by describing the lives of ordinary Piedmont textile workers throughout the late nineteenth century and much of the first half of the twentieth century as riddled with poverty, hunger, hardship, disease, and, in some cases, despair. Before the passage of the New Deal's National Industrial Recovery Act in 1933, these workers, disparagingly called “lintheads” or “factory trash” by townspeople and farmers alike, operated clattering weaving looms and spinning frames for ten or eleven hours a day, five days a week, plus a half day on Saturdays, for some of the lowest industrial wages in the United States. They worked in hot, humid conditions. Fine strands of lint and dust choked the air amid the deafening roar of the machinery, and these made eventual hearing loss and brown lung disease strong probabilities.

Keywords:   Piedmont textile workers, New Deal, Industrial Recovery Act, lintheads, factory trash, hearing loss, brown lung disease

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