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Disunion!The Coming of the American Civil War, 1789-1859$
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Elizabeth R. Varon

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780807832325

Published to North Carolina Scholarship Online: July 2014

DOI: 10.5149/9780807887189_varon

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To Consummate Its Boldest Designs the Slave Power Confronts The Republicans

To Consummate Its Boldest Designs the Slave Power Confronts The Republicans

Chapter:
(p.273) 8 To Consummate Its Boldest Designs the Slave Power Confronts The Republicans
Source:
Disunion!
Author(s):

Elizabeth R. Varon

Publisher:
University of North Carolina Press
DOI:10.5149/9780807887189_varon.13

This chapter discusses James Buchanan and the letters he received that expressed fear for the Union's survival and counsel on what he needed to do to restore the sectional equilibrium. On the prospect of a Republican victory, a Philadelphia Democrat confided: “As an American, the bare possibility of the evils that might flow from the election of a sectional president cannot but alarm me.” This correspondent, however, censured his own party for sectionalism, too, urging Buchanan to distance himself from the “intemperate language of some professed Democrats of the South.” Many other Northern Democrats asked Buchanan to dispel the impression that their party served “the especial interest of the South and slavery.”

Keywords:   James Buchanan, sectional equilibrium, Republican victory, Philadelphia, sectional president, Democrats

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