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Telling HistoriesBlack Women Historians in the Ivory Tower$
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Deborah Gray White

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780807832011

Published to North Carolina Scholarship Online: July 2014

DOI: 10.5149/9780807889121_white

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PRINTED FROM UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA PRESS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.northcarolina.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of North Carolina Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in NCSO for personal use.date: 21 September 2021

How a Hundred Years of History Tracked Me Down

How a Hundred Years of History Tracked Me Down

Chapter:
(p.252) How a Hundred Years of History Tracked Me Down
Source:
Telling Histories
Author(s):

Leslie Brown

Publisher:
University of North Carolina Press
DOI:10.5149/9780807889121_white.21

This chapter focuses on Leslie Brown, who was born in the year of Brown v. Board of Education, the landmark Supreme Court case that pried open educational doors that had previously been closed. Willing to take on the risks of being among “the first, the only, and the few,” she benefited educationally from the Great Society and affirmative action. As one of the desegregation generation, however, Brown confronted some of the same race and gender challenges that her parents had known and some new ones that they could not understand. As she achieved the aspirations her parents had for her, the distance between them widened. Their strategies for survival, experienced under segregation, grated against the ones Brown crafted to survive desegregation.

Keywords:   segregation, desegregation, Leslie Brown, Great Society, affirmative action

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