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How the Arabian Nights Inspired the American Dream 1791–1935$
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Susan Nance

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780807832745

Published to North Carolina Scholarship Online: September 2014

DOI: 10.5149/9780807894057_nance

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PRINTED FROM UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA PRESS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.northcarolina.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of North Carolina Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in NCSO for personal use.date: 16 October 2019

Ex Oriente Lux: Playing Eastern for a Living, 1838–1875

Ex Oriente Lux: Playing Eastern for a Living, 1838–1875

Chapter:
(p.51) Chapter 2 Ex Oriente Lux: Playing Eastern for a Living, 1838–1875
Source:
How the Arabian Nights Inspired the American Dream 1791–1935
Author(s):

Susan Nance

Publisher:
University of North Carolina Press
DOI:10.5149/9780807894057_nance.6

This chapter examines the Ex Oriente Lux mode of communication and how it prospered. It does so by comparing two important men who tried to sell their wares to American consumers: Christopher Oscanyan, a native of Istanbul; and Bayard Taylor of Pennsylvania. Their shared experiences show why mid-nineteenth-century Anglo-Americans preferred to hear about the East—in this case the Ottoman Empire—from fellow Anglo-Americans. Both Oscanyan and Taylor used an Ex Oriente Lux approach to present their personae as men of the East.

Keywords:   American consumers, Christopher Oscanyan, Bayard Taylor, Ottoman Empire, Anglo-Americans

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