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Infectious FearPolitics, Disease, and the Health Effects of Segregation$
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Samuel Kelton Roberts Jr.

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780807832592

Published to North Carolina Scholarship Online: July 2014

DOI: 10.5149/9780807894071_roberts

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Establishing Boundaries Politics, Science, and Stigma in the Early Antituberculosis Movement

Establishing Boundaries Politics, Science, and Stigma in the Early Antituberculosis Movement

Chapter:
(p.87) 4 Establishing Boundaries Politics, Science, and Stigma in the Early Antituberculosis Movement
Source:
Infectious Fear
Author(s):

Samuel Kelton Jr. Roberts

Publisher:
University of North Carolina Press
DOI:10.5149/9780807894071_roberts.8

This chapter describes the racialization of “house infection” theory, which occurred in the very late nineteenth century in response to the class implications of early bacteriology. The racial stigma that mediated blacks' inclusion in antituberculosis work also derived in part from the expansion of urban public health, itself a social and political response to urban industrial and population expansion. In the late nineteenth century, public health focused strongly on surveillance efforts based on principles of bacteriology and infection that were in many respects controversial and subject to popular and professional resistance and to political compromise. House infection theory, first introduced in the United States by Lawrence Flick, a physician and tuberculosis (TB) researcher at Philadelphia's Phipps Tuberculosis Institute, referred to the demonstrable proclivity of TB to be produced in certain “infected houses.”

Keywords:   racialization, house infection theory, bacteriology, racial stigma, antituberculosis work, Lawrence Flick

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