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We Have a Religion – The 1920s Pueblo Indian Dance Controversy and American Religious Freedom | North Carolina Scholarship Online
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We Have a Religion: The 1920s Pueblo Indian Dance Controversy and American Religious Freedom

Tisa Wenger

Abstract

For Native Americans, religious freedom has been an elusive goal. From nineteenth-century bans on indigenous ceremonial practices to twenty-first-century legal battles over sacred lands, peyote use, and hunting practices, the U.S. government has often acted as if Indian traditions were somehow not truly religious and therefore not eligible for the constitutional protections of the First Amendment. This book shows that cultural notions about what constitutes “religion” are crucial to public debates over religious freedom. In the 1920s, Pueblo Indian leaders in New Mexico and a sympathetic coali ... More

Keywords: religious freedom, indigenous ceremonial practices, sacred lands, peyote use, hunting practices, Indian traditions, Pueblos, United States

Bibliographic Information

Print publication date: 2009 Print ISBN-13: 9780807832622
Published to North Carolina Scholarship Online: September 2014 DOI:10.5149/9780807894217_wenger

Authors

Affiliations are at time of print publication.

Tisa Wenger, author