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Tropical BabylonsSugar and the Making of the Atlantic World, 1450-1680$
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Stuart B. Schwartz

Print publication date: 2004

Print ISBN-13: 9780807828755

Published to North Carolina Scholarship Online: September 2014

DOI: 10.5149/9780807895627_schwartz

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PRINTED FROM UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA PRESS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.northcarolina.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of North Carolina Press, 2022. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in NCSO for personal use.date: 06 July 2022

A Commonwealth within Itself: The Early Brazilian Sugar Industry, 1550–1670

A Commonwealth within Itself: The Early Brazilian Sugar Industry, 1550–1670

Chapter:
(p.158) Chapter Six A Commonwealth within Itself: The Early Brazilian Sugar Industry, 1550–1670
Source:
Tropical Babylons
Author(s):

Stuart B. Schwartz

Publisher:
University of North Carolina Press
DOI:10.5149/9780807895627_schwartz.10

This chapter discusses the introduction of sugarcane and the beginnings of the sugar industry in Brazil from 1550–1670. It begins with an overview of the Brazilian sugar economy and the expansion of the industry in the Atlantic market. This is followed by a brief overview of the Dutch experience with sugar production during their occupation of the Brazilian Northeast (1630–54). The chapter also examines the extensive use of sharecropping and other forms of contract, the transition from indigenous labor force to African slaves, and increased sugar shipping from Brazil during the period of the industry's rapid growth.

Keywords:   sugarcane, sugar industry, Brazil, sugar economy, Atlantic market, sugar production, Dutch, sharecropping, African slaves, shipping

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