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To Right These WrongsThe North Carolina Fund and the Battle to End Poverty and Inequality in 1960s America$
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Robert R. Korstad and James L. Leloudis

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780807833797

Published to North Carolina Scholarship Online: July 2014

DOI: 10.5149/9780807895740_korstad

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PRINTED FROM UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA PRESS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.northcarolina.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of North Carolina Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in NCSO for personal use.date: 17 October 2019

Alliances

Alliances

Chapter:
(p.57) 2 Alliances
Source:
To Right These Wrongs
Author(s):

Robert R. Korstad

Publisher:
University of North Carolina Press
DOI:10.5149/9780807895740_korstad.6

This chapter focuses on the 1930s, a time when the poor had been the nation's most visible citizens, and Franklin Roosevelt's New Deal had set out to relieve their suffering, to string beneath all Americans a social safety net, and to curb the worst imbalances of wealth and power. A decade later, World War II and the United States' global ascendancy ended the Great Depression and ushered in a new era of prosperity. Overnight, it seemed, America had become a nation of upwardly mobile suburbanites, living in comfortable single-family homes financed by GI loans and enjoying all of the conveniences of a burgeoning consumer economy. At the same time, the Cold War stifled dissent in the name of national security and choked off the politics of class.

Keywords:   Franklin Roosevelt, New Deal, social safety net, World War II, consumer economy, Great Depression

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